War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0039 Chapter XXX. SKIRMISHES AT AND ABOUT ZUNI, VA.

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According Colonel Dodge will be on the Chowan at noon this day, at Manny's Ferry, and give the impression that he is looking for a crossing. Only 14 miles from railway but 20 from Suffolk. About midnight South Quay camp will be shelled. Thursday night dash at Ivor or Franklin.

Had Wessells' old troops remained, proposed making clean thing of Franklin; but I am weaker than before. These new men do not know their facings, and their hearts are not in warfare, judging from their desertions. Can you loan me two old regiments for four of five days, to arrive light on Wednesday? We must not fail if we attempted on Franklin. Nottoway Bridge being done brings Weldon within two hours' time.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, Fort Monroe.

SUFFOLK, December 8, 1862.

I alluded to the arrival of two regiments at Franklin this morning. This is confirmed; also that a third one was sent down on Friday to Wakefield and marched across to Franklin. I have a man who left Petersburg on Friday. He says all the approaches are being fortified; that infantry and artillery were sent to Wakefield; that Jackson's infantry was falling back to Richmond. He was told a brigade of Stuart's cavalry was coming to the Blackwater; that the troops of General French had been ordered this way. He heard that 5,000 had gone from here to Carolina.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

General DIX.

SUFFOLK, December 9, 1862.

We shelled the rebel camps about midnight at South Quay.

Has been very cold; ice thick enough to bear a horse.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.

SUFFOLK, December 9, 1862.

We threw seventy odd shells into the South Quay camps with effect. Found the Chowan strongly picketed and watched. A brigade and 500 cavalry on the Lower Blackwater, below Franklin.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.

SUFFOLK, VA., December 12, 1862.

Ferry's command was all night on the route, in consequence of the numerous detentions, and had no sleep. The demonstrations since Monday having been very successful in drawing the very marked attention of the enemy, I have directed the return to-morrow of the commands. One captain, 1 sergeant, and 11 privates were captured on the other