War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0036 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Major Stratton and Lieutenants Buttz and Roper, of his regiment. The enemy retreated so suddenly that our artillery and infantry were not brought into action. The enemy's floating bridge swings from one bank of the Blackwater, which is very narrow, to the other, and is withdrawn from our side as soon as his forces cross.

Colonel J. R. Griffin and Major Boggs commanded the insurgents. General R. A. Pryor has just taken command at Franklin.

With the means of crossing, the enemy's position at Franklin might easily have been attacked, and in all probability carried.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

Numbers 2. Reports of Major General John J. Peck, U. S. Army.

SUFFOLK, December 2, 1862.

Our expedition, of which I advised you yesterday, has been a great success. Spies were sent in and a trap was sprung, but the rebels were caught. They attacked the advance this morning beyond Carrsville. We repulsed them, capturing the famous Petersburg Rocket Battery, and drove the whole force over the river. We are now shelling Franklin, having no means of crossing.

General Roger A. Pryor in command at Franklin; Colonel Joel R. Griffin commanding the cavalry and Major Boggs the artillery; thirty odd prisoners now, more being found in the woods; many of the enemy killed and wounded. Our loss trifling.

Colonel Spear led his cavalry most gallantry upon the enemy's advance.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe.

SUFFOLK, December 2, 1862.

In view of operations elsewhere, and of the fact that Spear has no means of crossing except with much loss and some risk of failure, I have directed him to hold on and shell the place, coming in to-night. The victory is now complete, but a repulse in crossing would take off the edge. The rebels have been tearing up the rails, so that we are not able to-day to use more than 8 or 10 miles. Parties are out at work. Will we get any pontoons?

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe.

SUFFOLK, VA.,, December 3, 1862.

On the morning of the 1st, contrabands reported that the rebels were throwing up works near the railway, 4 miles this side of Franklin. I