War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0033 Chapter XXX. SKIRMISH AT FRANKLIN, VA.

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sustained by the enemy, but a colored man who was near by thinks some of them were hurt. The man who was killed was first made prisoner, but was shot because he refused to mount behind a cavalrymen. His body was left lying in the road, but was recovered and brought into camp with morning.

A negro came to the lines this morning and states that the enemy was about 75 strong, and was concealed near the Hook store waiting for our cavalry to pass out. A corporal who lately deserted from the One hundredth New York Regiment was with the party of the enemy and directing their movements. The point where the attack was made is about a third of a mile outside the picket lines, and the men, 12 in number, were thrown out as an advance post. I am informed that when the enemy left the ground they announced that they intended to return to King and Queen County.

If I learn anything additional I will immediately communicate it to you.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. W. H. DAVIS,

Colonel One hundred and fourth Pennsylvania Vols., Commanding

Captain GEORGE H. JOHNSTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

NOVEMBER 17, 1862.- Affair near Carrsville, Va.

Report of Major General John J. Peck, U. S. Army.

SUFFOLK, November 17, 1862.

GENERAL: At noon Major Wetherill with 150 men came upon 400 cavalry half-way between Holland's Corners and Carrsville. He reported fighting and retiring slowly. From not hearing from his, I infer that he is all right.

My expedition left at 1 o'clock to-day and I hope for results.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.

NOVEMBER 18, 1862.- Skirmish at Franklin, Va.

Reports of Major General John J. Peck, U. S. Army, commanding at Suffolk.

SUFFOLK, November 18, 1862 - 1 p. m.

General Wessells reports that the enemy had been re-enforced at Franklin in infantry and artillery, and that he is strong there. The fords have been blocked, the approached closed, and the crossing is bad. A smart skirmish at the river, with only a horse wounded. It looks like rain.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

General DIX, Fort Monroe.

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