War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0016 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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FORT MONROE, VA., October 5, 1862- 12.45 p. m.

I planned an expedition, as I advised you, to destroy the floating bridge the enemy had thrown over the Blackwater at Franklin. We were to have had the co-operation of the gunboats from Albemarle Sound by order of Admiral Lee, but I think they must have met with obstructions, as they did not come. Our troops, less than 2,000 in number, under Colonel Spear, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, held the enemy, greatly superior in force, at bay at the river for several hours waiting for the gunboats. They behaved with great coolness, and, as we think, killed and wounded from 70 to 100 of the enemy. Our loss was 1 killed and 6 wounded and missing.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

General HALLECk, General-in-Chief.

FORT MONROE, VA., October 7, 1862.

Major-General Peck telegraphs me as follows:

Our affair at Franklin was of more importance than we judged. From an examination of several persons who were on the other side of the Blackwater I learn that the enemy's loss was over 200.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief.

Numbers 2. Reports of Major General John J. Peck, U. S. Army, commanding at Suffolk, including affair near Zuni.

SUFFOLK, October 4, 1862.

The gunboats were about 10 or 15 miles below Franklin yesterday. They fired a good many shots, but did not appear during the day. Had they not met obstructions they would have come up. They heard the enemy's guns doubtless, as I did. They have three heavy guns, one a 32-pounder, commanding the swinging bridge. Colonel Spear reports not less than 8,000 up and down the river. Yesterday they were massed near Zuni. Knowing the boats were on the way they will expect our concert and may mask Franklin. There is great uncertainly in operations with gunboats. Had they waited until the 9th our risk would have been much less. Now the move is adventure to Weldon and Petersburg it looks risky. The bridge can be rebuilt in a few hours, and the fords are low. I will carry out your instructions of you will send them.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.

SUFFOLK, October 4, 1862.

Have been out on the advance nearly all day. Troops all in. Spear had a nice fight. Loss, 1 killed and some 6 wounded and missing.

After full inquiry as to the affair I judge 70 to 10 of the enemy were