War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0867 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

below it, after having disembarked them above and marched them around.

Having already given my views as to the importance of dispatch in setting the proposed expedition for opening the Mississippi in motion, I will not consume your valuable time by adding anything more on that subject.

Yours, truly,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND.

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MEMPHIS,

Memphis, November 16, 1862.

Admiral DAVID D. PORTER,

Commanding United States Naval Forces, Cairo:

SIR: Yours of November 12 is just received, and though very busy receiving and disposing of troops, I hasten to answer as well as to fill my former promise to send yo a sketch of the Yazoo country. Inclosed is a map* compiled by my engineers of the best data at hand. I have another map not well scaled, which makes the mouth of Yazoo somewhat different from the one inclosed. Somewhat thus:

DISTANCES FROM VICKSBURG.

Miles.

To mouth of Old River.................................... 10

To mouth of Yazoo........................................ 8

Haines' Bluff............................................ 15

Mouth of Little Sunflower................................ 15

Mouth of Big Sunflower................................... 16

Satartia................................................. 9

Liverpool................................................ 5

Yazoo City............................................... 20

Honey Island............................................. 60 ______ 158

To where bulk of boats are grouped.

Names of boats up Yazoo: Natchez, Magnolia, E. J. Gay, Mary Keane, R. J. Lockland, Magenta, Ferd. Kennett, Alonzo Child, Peytona, Holems, Argo, Louisville, Samuel Hill, Cotton Plant, Paul Jones, and John Walsh.

I am not sure on this point, as at times I hear of eleven, and again same sawy as many as forty, but all agree as to the large boats, Natchez, Magnolia, Peytona, Magenta, &c.

My opinion is that a perfect concert of action should exist between all the forces of the United States operating down the valley; and I apprehend some difficulty may arise from the fact that you control on the river, Curtis on the west bank, and Grant on the east bank. Were either one of you in absolute command, all, of course, would act in concert. Our enemies are now also disconcerted by divided counsels; Van Dorn and Lovell are superior in lineal rank to Pemberton, and yet the latter is in command of the Department of Mississippi and Louisiana.

I think the forces now under Grant are able to handle anything in Mississippi; and our men are now confident and pretty well drilled. We can advance southward, striking Grenada and interposing between Vicksburg and Jackson, but your fleet should be abreast or ahead of

---------------

*Omitted, as unimportant.

---------------