War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0853 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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the Government, then, as a limited alternative, I propose a smaller force, whose immediate purpose, in conjunction with the Mississippi fleet, should be to capture Vicksburg and Baton Rouge, and simply reopen the Mississippi River, waiting for a more favorable period for the execution of the more extensive plan.

Accompanying this communication is a map illustrating the views it embodies,* all of which is here deferentially submitted.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON CITY, October 16, 1862.

The GENERAL-IN-CHIEF:

At the instance of the Secretary of War, with whom I have conversed upon the subject, I address you this communication.

Advised that an expedition of land and naval forces will be immediately set on foot, for the purpose of opening the Mississippi River, and that the land, force will, presently, consist of 30,000 men, I would, in view of the character of the service contemplated, organize it into the different arms as follows: 24,000 infantry, 1,000 sharpshooters, 400 suppers and miners, 3,000 cavalry, 1,500 light artillery, and 100 heavy artillery.

I think ten batteries of six guns each might be very properly assigned to the artillery arm, these batteries to consist of guns of different caliber, as follows: fourteen 10-pounder Parrott guns, twenty-eight Napoleon guns, six 24-pounder howitzers (brass), eight 6-pounder smooth bore guns (brass), and four 12-pounder howitzers (brass). I would also add twelve siege pieces, as follows: eight 30-pounder Parrott guns and four 10-inch mortars.

Your obedient servant,

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Memphis, October 25, 1862.

Colonel D. C. ANTHONY, Provost-Marshal, Memphis:

SIR: The publication of my General Orders, Numbers 90, imposing on you new and additional labor and responsibility, makes the occasion proper for me to express my high appreciation of the manner you have hitherto performed the delicate and important duties of your office. Memphis is, in my judgment, a most important point in a military sense, designed as a base for operating on the Mississippi River and in the interior of Mississippi and Arkansas. It should be made as secure as Cincinnati, Louisville, or Saint Louis. To this end the quiet an good order of the city itself is necessary. This has been admirably accomplished by you, with as little interference with the people as possible. I have observed always that, however severe your measurers were, all persons conceded to you generous and courteous treatment, and the suspicion of fraud and peculation, as connected with the handling of large amounts of confiscated property and custody of prisoners, has never been imputed to you or officers under your charge. You possess my undivided confidence, and in the discharge of your new duties you may feel assured that I will sustain you with my whole power. Your regiment is not stationed here,

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*Not found.

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