War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0822 Chapter XXIX. WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS.

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damage otherwise in your power. You had better move by the edge of the bottom until you can pass Coldwater north of the mouth of the Pass; but this route I leave to your discretion. You can extend your operations as circumstances in your judgment admit. If you leave the Pass return to the river, move to the north of Grant's position, cutting off his communication and destroying his wagon trains.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

JACKSON, MISS., January 2, 1863.

Major-General VAN DORN Mobile:

General Pemberton telegraphs that the enemy is re-embarking. It will be necessary to make another cavalry dash. Come in time to over take him.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

VICKSBURG, January 2, 1863.

Major GEORGE WHITFIELD,

Assistant Quartermaster, Jackson:

Send no more troops hare until further orders.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding

VICKSBURG, January 2, 1863.

Major-General LORING, Grenada:

Countermand the order for movement of Texas cavalry. The enemy has re-embarked and gone down the Yazoo, leaving quantity of entrenching tools and other property.

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

JACKSON, MISS., January 2, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON, Vicksburg:

In directing the cavalry movement we must consider that Grant is on the Central road. I have directed the scouted the scouts on the river to be on the alert. I shall stop the troops which come from the east until I hear from you. Can the enemy intend another attempt to approach Vicksburg?

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

JACKSON, MISS., January 2, 1863.

Lieutenant-General PEMBERTON, Vicksburg:

The President telegraphs twelve frigates, two brigs, two schooners, and two transports at Pensacola. General Loring, in reply to a question, reports 10,000 men gone from Holly Spring to Memphis. General