War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0794 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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HDQRS. DEPT. OF MISSISSIPPI AND EAST LOUISIANA, Jackson, December 11, 1862.

Major General MARTIN L. SMITH,

Commanding Second Military District:

GENERAL: In answer to inquiry of this date I am instructed by the lieutenant-general commanding to inform you that there is a brigade of troops at this point which will be sent you in an emergency.

I am, general, very respectfully,

J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. DEPT. OF MISS., AND E. LA.,

Jackson, Miss., December 12, 1862.

The necessities of this army and the abuses occasioned by speculators render it necessary that no corn or fodder shall be taken by private parties beyond the limits of this department.

The necessity for prompt and ample transportation tom move the large quantity of Government forage now being purchased requires that no corn or fodder belonging to private parties be transported over any of the railroads in this department until otherwise ordered from these headquarters.

By order of Lieutenant General J. C. Pemberton:

J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. 2nd CORPS, DEPT. OF MISS. AND E. LA., Numbers 82.

Grenada, Miss., December 14, 1862.

I. The major-general commanding has learned with very profound regret that the troops of Green's brigade are greatly disaffected by reason of their being kept upon this side of the Mississippi River, and particularly by the detention in the service beyond their original term of enlistment. He has been informed that there is danger that some of them may under the impulse of this disaffection (which has been artfully intensified by designing men) do acts which will not only bring disgrace upon themselves and their comrades and their State, and which may bring disaster and ruin upon the cause for which they have done and suffered so much. He therefore asks them to listen to a few words of counsel and advice.

He admits they have much seeming cause to be discontented. They were, most of them, enlisted under his assurance that they would not be brought away from Missouri, but would be permitted to fight there for the independence of their own State and for the defense or the recovery of their own homes. He believes that without that assurance they would have preferred to fight, as they had therefore fought, an unpaid soldiery under that flag of Missouri, beneath whose folds they had never suffered defeat, but under which they had won victories which will never by forgotten so long as valor and patriotism shall be honored among men. He gave that assurance in perfect good faith, believing then, as he believes now, that he was authorized to give it. The men who had enlisted under that assurance were nevertheless immediately transferred to this side of the Mississippi River, far away from their invaded homes and their hapless families, and they had hardly been brought hither be-