War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0753 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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trust that you will give me your full co-operation and that you will give the matter your personal attention, as I intrust it to you. It is not with an intention that all these stores remain at Vicksburg, but that they be shipped to this place, at least a large proportion of them. You will keep me by reports duly advised of you acts in the premises.

I am, major, respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CUNEY,

Major and Chief of Subsistence.

RICHMOND, November 19, 1862.

Lieutenant General T. H. HOLMES,

Little Rock, Ark., via Vicksburg, Miss.:

Vicksburg is threatened and requires to be re-enforced. Can you send troops from your command-say 10,000-to operate either opposite to Vicksburg or to cross the river? It is conceded here that this movement will greatly add to the defense of Arkansas.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

RICHMOND, November 19, 1862.

General PEMBERTON:

General Holmes has been ordered by telegraph to send 10,000 men to Vicksburg, and General Bragg telegraphed to do what in his judgment is necessary to same Vicksburg from capture. General Bragg by virtue of his rank commands all that section of country.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

OFFICE CHIEF OF SUB., DEPT. OF MISS. AND EAST LA., Jackson, Miss., November 20, 1862.

Major T. B. REED,

Vicksburg, Miss.:

SIR: Since writing you on yesterday it has occurred to me that perhaps my letter of instructions was not as full as I intended that it should be; hence I again write.

I wish you to take all necessary measures to obtain and accumulate at Vicksburg all army stores that can be procured, and that you obtain them from any points where they can be procured. I also deem it a matter of the greatest importance to secure mills within the lines of defenses at Vicksburg, to grind meal in case the enemy cut off the supply from other points. You are therefore particularly charge to attend this matter and secure the mills. I deem it most advisable to contract for the grinding of the meal; but if this cannot be done, then you must secure a Government mill.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. CUNEY,

Major and Chief of Subsistence.

48 R R-VOL XVII, PT II