War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0726 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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JACKSON, MISS., October 11, 1862.

General S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

General Van Dorn with 12,000 men is at Holly Springs. General Price with about 12,000 men, demoralized, is some 10 miles distant. The enemy is concentrating in their front. General Tilghman is about joining Van Dorn with the few remaining exchanged prisoners. I have called on the Governor of Mississippi for the militia. I have called on General Blanchard to re-enforce Van Dorn. He meeds strong re-enforcements at once. General Forney has sent a regiment to Columbus Musket-caps, cartridges, lead, and cannon ammunition are needed.

DANIEL RUGGLES,

Brigadier-General.

JACKSON, MISS., October 11, 1862.

Major-General VAN DORN, Holly Springs:

Your telegram received. One of our prisoners of war, a colonel, informs General Beall that an expedition of 5,000 infantry, three companies of cavalry, and two batteries is about to leave New Orleans, supposed for Camp Moore, as troops are moved by night by railroad to Lake Pontchartrain. This news and your telegram received at the same time. Steedman's regiment, not armed, at Port Hudson; Drake's at Ponchatoula. Have ordered troops at Vicksburg in readiness. Have telegraphed Blanchard for re-enforcements. General Tilghman will join you to-morrow with his last men. I have called on the Governor for militia to concentrate on the Tallahatchie for your orders. General Forney has sent one regiment to Columbus. We trust in God that you will whip the enemy.

DANIEL RUGGLES,

Brigadier-General.

JACKSON, MISS., October 11, 1862.

Honorable GEORGE W. RANDOLPH:

I am directed by General Van Dorn to say that he will give battle at Holly Springs, or this side the Tallahatchie, as circumstances may determine.

CLEMENT SULLIVANE,

Aide-de-Camp.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE,

Richmond, Va., October 11, 1862.

Honorable J. PHELAN, Confederate States Senate:

MY DEAR SIR: I have read and return the telegram inclosed. My attention was given to the subject in anticipation of disaster, which the want of co-intelligence and co-operation suggested. Major-General Pemberton was sent to Jackson, and as soon as the repulse of our forces at Corinth was known I submitted, for the advice and consent of the Senate, the nomination of General Pemberton to be lieutenant-general, having confidence in his ability to make the most of the means for the protection of Mississippi, &c. If he is confirmed he will be able to