War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0669 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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2d. You will pursue a kind and conciliatory policy toward all Union men who are not suspected of giving aid and comfort to the enemy. These you will arrest and keep under guard and notify the general of the fact. Private property must not be impressed.

3d. You will promptly arrest all men who sell cotton to the enemy and send them to these headquarters.

4th. You will make your requisitions for quartermaster's and commissary supplies upon any post quartermaster or commissary, and such officer is hereby authorized and required to fill such requisitions when practicable.

It is utterly impossible to furnish you transportation from this point. The chief quartermaster of the army will be directed to give you instructions as to that and as to the purchase of forage.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. L. SNEAD,

Adjutant-General.

TUPELO, MISS., August 7, 1862.

Colonel JOHN ADAMS, Columbus, Miss.:

Only two regiments can be left at Columbus, and they must be in readiness to move.

THOS. L. SNEAD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE TENNESSEE, Tupelo, Miss., August 7, 1862.

Colonel W. H. MOORE,

Commanding Forty-third Mississippi Regiment, Gainesville, Miss.:

COLONEL: You will move your regiment at once to Tupelo. The trains will be put at your disposal for that purpose within the next three or four days. One company may, if absolutely required, be left to garrison the post for a few days. General Price expects you to move promptly.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, &c.,

THOS. L. SNEAD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., August 7, 1862.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I did not write you about the movement here or during the course of it because General Bragg said he would, and he of course could write more intelligibly than I could of the plans and views with which the movement was undertaken. To me, as matters stood-at a dead-lock-at Tupelo, the transfer off the Army of the Mississippi to this place and change of base were most acceptable, though really, in view of past events, I am not so hopeful as I used to be of seeing a mobilized army, and I shall not count too strongly on results until I see this army on the other bank of the Tennessee. McLean has been changed, but not for the better I fear, and I fear much the present incumbent of the chief quartermaster's chair is a complete obstruction, who might do very well to administer in peace times the duties of a