War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0654 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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GENERAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE, Number 1. Tupelo, Miss., July 21, 1862.

I. The undersigned, by order of the general commanding the department, assumes command of the District of the Tennessee, which comprises Northwestern Alabama and all that portion of the State of Mississippi which is north of the thirty-second parallel latitude and east of the Pearl River, and of the line of the Mississippi Central Railroad from Jackson to Grand Junction. Headquarters have been established until further orders at Tupelo.

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IV. The following officers are announced as constituting the staff of the major-general commanding: Major Thomas L. Snead, chief of staff and assistant adjutant-general; Capts. James M. Loughborough and L. A. Maclean, assistant adjutants-general; Captain Henry M. Clarke, inspector-[general]; Major John Reid, chief commissary; Major Randolph H. Dyer, chief quartermaster; Surg. Thomas D. Wooten, medical director; Surg. Joseph T. Scott, medical inspector; Captain Thomas H. Price, chief of ordnance; Captain L. Fremaux, acting chief of engineers; Lieuts. Robert C. Wood and H. Clay Taylor, aides de-camp.

STERLING PRICE,

Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS OF THE FORCES, Number 3. Tupelo, Miss., July 21, 1862.

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IV. Adams', Slemons', and Wheeler's regiments of cavalry are transferred for duty to the Army of the West. Colonel Wheeler's will report accordingly to Major-General Price.

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By command of General Bragg:

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL'S OFFICE, Richmond, Va., July 22, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding, &c., Tupelo, Miss.:

Your letter of June 29th was duly received and submitted to the President. In reply to that part of it which relates to the appointment of additional general officers of your command, I am instructed by the President to say that he feels himself not a little embarrassed in carrying out your wishes on account of the restrictions of law. By the act of Congress of March 6, 1861, "to provide for the public defense," the President is authorized to organize regiments into brigades and brigades into divisions, and to appoint the commanding officers of such brigades and divisions, subject to the confirmation of Congress, who are to hold their offices only while such brigades and divisions are in service. To this extent and no further has the President the power to appoint general officers.

In examining your return showing the organization of your command he finds that you have 29 brigades and 7 division, including the command of Brigadier-General Breckinridge, while the records of appointment