War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0556 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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SAINT LOUIS, MO., January 12, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

General Grant has made requisitions upon me for transportation for 16,000 men to embark from Memphis. I have sent down an express boat with an officer on board instructed to turn back all boats bound upward. This will take all boats from this river. Have also telegraphed to Colonel Swords to send all the boats he can procure from the Ohio. I feel confident that there will be transportation sufficient for all the troops at General Grant's disposal. General Curtis has advised General Gorman to send all the troops he can spare from Helena. At least 5,000 men could be sent from that point.

ROBT. ALLEN.

GENERAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 2. Post of Arkansas, January 12, 1863.

Pursuant to General Orders, Numbers 210 dated December 18, 1862, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, D. C., the corps now commanded by Major General W. T. Sherman will be known as the Fifteenth Army Corps.

Its organization will remain unchanged.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Numbers 12. Memphis, Tenn., January 12, 1863.

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IX. Brigadier-General Ewing's brigade,now under orders to join the Mississippi expedition, is hereby assigned to Brigadier General Morgan L. Smith's division of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and will report accordingly.

By order of Major General U. S. Grant:

[JNO. A. RAWLINS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Numbers 3. Post of Arkansas, January 12, 1863.

I. Ignorance of the rules of war as to pillage and plunder can no longer be pleaded. Laws of Congress, orders of the President, and my own have again been published.

A thorough inspection of every regiment and about will be made within twenty-four hours of the publication of this order, and the colonel of any regiment or commander of any company who allows any officer or soldier in his command to keep or use a horse, mule, gun, pistol, saddle, or any property not his own will be arrested, and the offender will at once be put in irons or tried and confined in the hold of sod steamboat, in charge of the provost guard.

Colonel Hoge, of the One hundred and thirteenth Illinois, is charged with the execution of this order, and his regiment is assigned to duty as provost guard. Colonel Hoge by himself or any officer of his regiment with a written order, may search for stolen property, take it away