War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0525 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

LA GRANGE, January 3, 1863.

General McARTHUR:

Van Dorn is concentrating at Pontotoc for another raid. Have stockades put up at points occupied by troops along the railroad, and let every command be on the alert. No officer or man will be allowed to accept a parole from any cavalry force. The raid must be repulsed while there is a musket or a cartridge.

C. S. HAMILTON,

Brigadier-General.

LA GRANGE, January 3, 1863.

General GRANT:

Lee has returned to near Moscow. Richardson ran off. Lee got 8 prisoners and 170 horses and mules. Shall begin moving infantry. Sullivan is here.

C. S. HAMILTON,

Brigadier-General.

McPHERSON'S HEADQUARTERS,

January 3, 1863.

General GRANT:

The river is rising so fast there is danger of its carrying bridges away, and I think of ordering Colonel Leggestt's brigade over to this side. What is to be done with Captain Font's company and the contrabands? I did not exactly understand yesterday whether it was understood between Captain Prince and yourself that I was to order them to Holly Springs.

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Holly Springs, Miss., January 3, 1863.

Major General STEPHEN A. HURLBUT,

Commanding District of Memphis:

Some citizens of Memphis were overheard to say that there was a determination that we should not run the Memphis and Charleston Railroad; that it will be easier to interrupt that and force us to move the army to Memphis for supplies than to come here to fight the main army.

It is my determination to run the road as long as we require it, and if necessary I will remove every family and every species of personal property between the Hatchie and Coldwater Rivers. I will also move south every family in Memphis of doubtful loyalty, whether they have taken the oath of allegiance or not, if it is necessary for our security, and you can so notify them. For every raid or attempted raid by guerrillas upon the road I want ten families of the most noted secessionists sent south. If the enemy, with his regularly organized forces, attack us I do not propose to punish non-combatant citizens for it; but these guerrillas receive support and countenance from this class of citizens, and by their acts will bring punishment upon them.

In this matter I wish to give this letter all the force of an order.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.