War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0493 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Denver's division arrives, when it will return and guard the road indicated in the first order. You can place your artillery at the different posts within your command according to your judgment. At all bridges the men should build block-houses.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HUMBOLDT, December 26, 1862.

General SULLIVAN:

I am now ready to start north. Cannot say hew far I shall go to-day. Whenever I stop I will at once telegraph, if communication be not broken. In case it is I desire that you send me re-enforcements, for it may be that after we get away near the Obion the rebels will seek to cut communications and attack on both sides. To provide against this, if communication be cut, send some old troops, and if not needed I will send than back. No news this a. m. Have you any?

I. N. HAYNIE,

Brigadier-General.

NINETEEN MILES SOUTH OF RIPLEY, MISS.,

December 26, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

Van Dorn is making his way back to Pemberton as fast as he can go. I have followed him as closely as possible. I am 19 miles from Pontotoc, but may go there. Unless I can learn that a force of ours is south of Van Dorn farther pursuit will be useless, and to-morrow I shall turn back toward Oxford. If I can make him fight I will do so.

I have taken many prisoners.

J. K. MIZNER,

Colonel, Commanding Cavalry.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 27, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

General Davies reports Columbus as now entirely safe, but General Hurlbut reports Memphis as not sufficiently strong. Can you not give him re-enforcement for a few days till he can open communication with General Grant? These raids are probably intended to draw back our troops from Vicksburg. This must be avoided.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

COLUMBUS, KY., December 27, 1862.

(Received 4 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army:

From the best information from persons from Trenton and other points I find the road is greatly damaged, not so much in the wood-work as in the rails. They built fires upon the rails on one side, which