War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0491 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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JACKSON, December 26, 1862-3.30 p. m.

Major-General GRANT:

The following dispatches I have this moment received from General haynie, dated at Trenton at noon to-day:

GENERAL: We arrived here at noon. I met one of my scouts who went up toward Columbus day before yesterday. he reported to me that all I have heard of the favorable condition of the road and bridges is untrue; says that Union City was taken and all or nearly all the bridges and trestles are burned that high up, and that it will take a long while to repair them. The rebel force is large. I can move after Forrest, but then I leave points unguarded; and a force of several hundred are threatening the road between Humboldt and this point north of Brownsville.

Colonel Dawson has a regiment, and John Irwin, brother-in-law of Cheeny, of Savannah, reports another force of cavalry or mounted infantry as crossing the Tennessee. I can possibly mount 1,500 men. I will dos o and attack if I can.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

JACKSON, December 26, 1862-7.30 p. m.

Major-General GRANT:

Van Dorn seems to be in north of Hatchie with a large force. Forrest is near Union City. Mr. Spears brings me information that Van Dorn is planning an attack on Jackson. I think now, general, that a sufficient force should be speedily sent here to capture the whole of this force. I am not able with my small force to assume the offensive and guard what we yet hold.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

JACKSON, December 26, 1862-8.30 p. m.

Major-General GRANT:

Every available man is now north. I will send this evening troops that have just returned from a fatiguing march. I have no doubt that the design of rebels is to weaken this post by making me send off my men, and then, marching rapidly to the rear, capture and destroy the stores. What can be done shall be done.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

JACKSON, December 26, 1862.

U. S. GRANT:

Colonel Webster will furnish the cars to-morrow. The cars will probably follow the mail train in the morning. I can secure the road as you wish. I have organized my forces to meet Forrest. I have made every attempt to mount infantry but cannon succeed in procuring more than 1,000 horses. I believe by moving toward Dresden and Paris Forrest will be compelled to pass behind Bolivar and Jackson to escape. Unless he has arrangements for crossing the Tennessee lower than Clifton, your cavalry can meet him.

JER. C. SULLIVAN.