War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0489 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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CORINTH, MISS., December 26, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

One of our men arrived yesterday from Tullahoma, Tenn.; ten days on the road. The main body of Bragg's army was there. They were retreating to Chattanooga. All the stores were being sent there and they were collecting all the corn and stock and forage, taking it to Chattanooga. On his road he met fifteen droves of hogs, cattle, and sheep, in Lincoln and Giles Counties, all being driven to the same place. They saw men from Bragg's army in three counties to the Tennessee River, collecting produce and stock and taking it all that way. he brings same report as sent two days ago of force south of Tennessee River.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

HOLLY SPRINGS, December 26, 1862.

General SULLIVAN, Jackson, Tenn.:

Van Dorn went to Bolivar pursued by our cavalry, then struck south-east through Saulsbury and Ripley. Our cavalry was till in pursuit at that point, and have not since been heard from. This was yesterday. They are now near Grenada. Two deserters came in from Van Dorn to-day; they left him 10 miles north of New Albany at 10 o'clock last night, still going south. If there is any cavalry north of the Hatchie it must be some small irregular band.

Send cars to Davis' Mill and I will order four regiments more up to you. Collect all the bacon, beef, hogs, sheep, and grain you can from planters. Mount all the infantry you can and drive Forrest est of the Tennessee.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HOLLY SPRINGS, MISS., December 26, 1862.

General SULLIVAN:

How are your forces now located?

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

JACKSON, December 26, 1862-11.20 a. m.

Major-General GRANT:

I have one-third of my force opening road to Union City, under command of General Haynie. I have under Colonel Lawler 1,000 men who have been after the rebs, and will to-day be at Toone's Station or on their return. I will send immediately that force north on railroad. I am unable to get nearer the enemy than within sight, when they immediately retreat.

My cavalry was entirely broken up, and it is difficult to reorganize it. All my officers telegraph that they are collecting forage and cattle, but have received no statement of amount. Van Dorn is reported to have escaped our cavalry, and, crossing the Hatchie, has made his way to join Forrest. Reports from Obion are less favorable, but as they are merely rumors I do not place much reliance on them.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.