War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0462 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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Yet I am not relieved from duty here so that I may go forward and receive orders from General Grant. Please order me forward.

JOHN A. MCCLERNAND,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, D. C., December 23, 1862-8.45 p. m.

Major-General MCCLERNAND, Springfield, Ill.:

It has not been my understanding that you should remain at Springfield a single hour beyond your own pleasure and judgment of the necessity of collecting and forwarding the troops. You are relieved of duty at Springfield, and will report to General Grant for the purpose specified in the order of the General-in-Chief.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

COLUMBUS, KY., December 23, 1862.

(Received 5.30 p. m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army:

The forces of the enemy, derived from a paroled officer, are: Russell's cavalry, 450; Gurley's cavalry, 120; Forrest's (old), 500; woodward's mounted infantry, 400; Dibrell's, 400; Starnes', 500; Cox's battalion 250; Little's body guard, 100; others, 500; eight pieces of artillery, 180 men; total, 3,400. From all information most of them are unreliable troops; some picked men.

In October last I applied to General Grant to mount the Second Division with such material as could be taken from the country in Mississippi. If you would allow me to make a suggestion, I think we require mounted infantry, and if the authority can be given for such a force it can be promptly done and these raids effectually prevented. The road will probably be in running order in a very few days.

THOS. A. DAVIES,

Brigadier-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 23, 1862.

Brigadier General THOMAS A. DAVIES, Columbus, Ky.:

Telegraph condition of affairs in West Tennessee. Have you any communication with General Grant?

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

COLUMBUS, KY., December 23, 1862-10.30 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

Your dispatch of 11.35 received. The amount of the raid in round numbers is about 400 or 500 troops captured, as far as I ascertain. Very little public property destroyed. The enemy left Rutherford yesterday at 8 a. m. Nothing heard from there since. I have a construction train. Leave here to-morrow morning. Have four bridges, 1,500