War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0447 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

There has probably been a fight at or near Jackson, Tenn., as the rebels were near that place in considerable force, but Grant has concentrated a pretty heavy force to meet them and has no fears for the result. He thinks very few of them will get away. The rebel cavalry which your scout speaks of dashed into Holly Springs this morning early and inflicted considerable damage, cut the telegraph wires, &c. It is not know yet the amount of damage done, or whether they captured any of our soldiers.

As our cavalry, or nearly all of it, has been moved from your front you must be on your guard, vigilant, wide awake. Do not get surprised, and learn as much as you can about the movements and designs of the enemy. Keep me well informed.

Yours, truly,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, D. C., December 21, 1862.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS, Saint Louis, Mo.:

Re-enforce Columbus as quickly and strongly as you can.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 21, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER CAIRO, ILL.:

Send to Columbus all your available forces.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 21, 1862.

Brigadier General THOMAS A. DAVIES, Columbus, Ky.:

General Curtis and the commanding officer at cairo have been directed to re-enforce you as quickly as possible. Do everything in your power to reopen and protect the railroad. Notify General Hurlbut and the commanding officer at Memphis of the condition of affairs. What is the enemy's force? Communicate with Admiral Porter, who will probably be able to prevent the enemy from recrossing the Tennessee.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WATERFORD, December 21, 1862.

General GANT:

No sings of Mizner yet. Shall I move without him? Rations needed here to-day

C. C. MARSH,

Colonel, &c.