War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0369 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Each reconnaissance will require two days, but in the mean time I shall move my camp to the southeast if I can find water, and go some miles.

Lieutenant Webber, Fourth Illinois Cavalry, was seriously but not dangerously wounded in neck yesterday.

I can make room for McPherson here, but from here to Tallahatchie there is no water on the road.

Respectfully,

C. S. HAMILTON,

Brigadier-General.

LUMPKIN'S MILL, MISS., November 30, 1862-3 p. m.

General GRANT:

I have just heard from Lee. He has pushed the enemy to the river and is himself within 1 mile of the river. He reports this side of river protected by two circular field works, four to six embrasures each, and they are occupied in force. He will return this evening, leaving cavalry enough to mask our front.

I have a negro who left Abbeville last night at 11 o'clock. He is servant to private in General Lovell's force. Heard his master say that Price with his army had gone to Panola, on Grenada and Memphis road. Says bulk of rebel army is at Tallahatchie, month of Tippah, and at Rocky Ford. He says orders were given yesterday morning to strike tents and put three days' rations in haversacks, and thinks it is a preparation to leave, but knows nothing more to confirm it. Says the enemy was in line of battle yesterday at Tallahatchie. Thinks railroad bridge is not injured yet.

Lee says quite a force will be necessary to carry works on this side. He has shelled them, but his fire was returned with interest. I suppose he is now falling back, but will keep force enough to mask the ground gained and also to watch the enemy. The rebel pickets are within 4 miles of me on the southeast. I will clean out things in that direction to-morrow morning.

Yours,

C. S. HAMILTON,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. LEFT WING, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Lumpkin's, November 30, 1862-3 p. m.

Colonel LEE:

You second dispatch just received. You have done well enough. In falling back leave force to watch and report if enemy fall back during the night. Things look something like evacuation, and if they do leave we want to know it at once. If they give up this side, leaving their works, it will be pretty good evidence of

general move to the rear.

I sent you instructions about falling back by previous courier. Nothing further to add. If rebels hold on where they are you will have to make a dash at their rear with all the cavalry in a day or two, going to the eastward. I shall look for you this evening. Don't get out of ammunition. Save enough to use if it shall be necessary to cover your falling back.

Yours,

C. S. HAMILTON,

Brigadier-General.

24 R R-VOL XVII, PT II