War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0281 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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can reach the shore. He will keep an account and except from the execution of this order all parties that he may have reason to believe have not been rendezvousing the guerrillas. This is done to let the guerrillas who attacked the Catahoula feel that certain destruction awaits the country for firing on steamboats engaged in carrying supplies needed by the planters between Memphis and Helena. Major Taylor will send a section of artillery along, subject to Colonel Walcutt's order.

The quartermaster will at once provide a suitable steamboat to drop down to the fort by sunset.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JACKSON, TENN., October 19, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

We have Falkner, 3 of his officer, and 12 men. How shall they be treated? They claim to be regulars in the army and entitled to exchange. I think the officers at least should be held.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Bolivar, Tenn., October 19, 1862.

Colonel NOBLE, Chief of Cavalry, Bolivar:

COLONEL: You will send out an expedition of 450 cavalry, under the command of one of your most thorough, active, and intelligent officers, in the direction of Brownsville, to intercept and cut off if possible Colonel Falkner's cavalry force, defeated day before yesterday at Island Numbers 10. You will direct them to move up on the north side of the Hatchie, ascertain if possible the ford or bridge they are making for, and try and cut them off. the commander of the expedition must move with all possible celerity, but at the same time use due caution against being surprised and cut off himself. Three days' rations must be taken with the men.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

CORINTH, MISS., October 19, 1862-2.10 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Our cavalry, in the face of the enemy, and in the best possible season for a campaign, are without arms. Of the 900 revolving arms your ordered sent me, only 439 have been received. One thousand breech-loading or revolving arms and 2,000 pistols are necessary to arm our cavalry, including recruits. Cavalry without arms anywhere is bad enough, but on a hostile frontier it is not only waste but murder. For Heaven's sake do something for us if you can. Please answer.

W. S. ROSECRANS.