War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0270 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, October 9, 1862.

Major-General GRANT, Jackson, Tenn.:

Governor Johnson is very desirous that troops be sent to Clarksville. How far is the Cumberland navigable, and how could troops be sent to Clarksville?

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

CORINTH, October 9, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

Paroled now 813 enlisted men, 43 commissioned officers, in good health; about 700 Confederate wounded, already sent to Iowa, paroled; 350 wounded paroled here; cannot tell the number of dead yet. About 800 Confederates already buried; their loss about eight or ten to one of ours. Prisoners arriving by every wagon road and train; will send full reports as soon as possible. No return yet from the hospitals. The woods stink yet with unburied dead. Oglesby shot through the breast and ball lodged, in the spine; hope for his recovery. No news from Rosecrans.

I understand Hamilton's division, my regiment, and others left Rienzi yesterday at 4 p. m. for the west; nothing authentic from them. Hillyer is here. Shall I send any wounded Confederates to Saint Louis? Our hospitals are full of them. McKean telegraphs me he will be here this night.

P. E. BURKE,

Colonel Western Sharpshooters, Fourteenth Mo. Vols., Commanding

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION,

Bolivar, Tenn., October 9, 1862-3 p. m.

Brigadier General L. F. ROSS,

Commanding Expedition:

Report just received. The enemy are in greater force than I expected. You will watch your flanks, especially on the La Grange side. The country around Davis' Mill, is very rough, and you may find trouble in working the artillery down. Be as rapid as possible, but cautious, and where you strike, strike hard.

The thing to be done, under General Grant's order, is to destroy the bridge or force them to do so. Listen for cars to-night; reconnoiter closely; finish the work, and return as soon as possible. Even if you whip them severely you mist not pursue too far, for they still have the railroad and may have been joined by Van Dorn.

I shall expect you back by day after to-morrow. Keep me advised from time to time of all that is being done.

Yours,

[S. A. HURLBUT,]

Major-General.

BOLIVAR, TENN., October 9, 1862.

Major General U. S. GRANT, Jackson, Tenn.:

I have no camp-kettles or other utensils for prisoners, and suggest that they be removed at once to Alton or some other point, or, if kept here, that necessary utensils be furnished. There are none here.