War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0265 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The right-hand road turns off 2 miles in rear of Alexander's. Let the advance guard go well ahead, sending its advances forward to report the road back to the head of the column. At Smith's there is a road that runs across the railroad to Concord Meeting-House, about 5 miles from Chewalla, on Hamburg and Chewala road. Smith's is a mile from Jones'.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. GODDARD,

First Lieutenant Twelfth Infty. Ohio Vols., Actg. Asst. Adjt. General

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, October 5, 1862-2 p. m.

Brigadier-General STANLEY,

Commanding Division:

You had better take the nearest northern road. I will send you a guide. McKean's halt appears to have interfered with our movements. Advance rapidly, and when you halt close in mass; get out of the road if possible. Overtake McPherson if you can; nothing heard from him. Tell your advance guard to get the names of all the houses on the road, and when you write date your dispatch from the house, and side of the road it is on.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. R. THOMPSON,

Acting Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, October 5, 1862.

Major-General VAN DORN,

Commanding Confederate Forces:

Major-General Rosecrans' compliments to Major-General Van Dorn, commanding officer Confederate forces, and states that provision has been made for the burial of the dead, and a soldier's tribute will be paid those who fell fighting bravely, as did many in Maury's division.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

THIRD DIV., DIST. WEST TENN.,

Numbers 252.

Corinth, October 5, 1862.

I. During the pursuit of Price, Colonel Burke will remain in command of Corinth. The Yates Sharpshooters, Captain Williams' battalion First Infantry, a regiment to be furnished by General Davies, a battalion of cavalry to be furnished by Colonel Mizner, together with his own regiment, the camp of the convalescents and guards of the baggage train will constitute the garrison. Colonel Burke is charged with the defense of the place, the protection of public property, the arrest of all stragglers, the mustering of all prisoners, the supervision of all hospitals, collection of the arms, equipments, and quartermaster stores from the field of battle, and the counting and burial of the dead.

The chief surgeons of hospitals will without delay make and furnish Colonel Burke exact lists of the wounded under their care.