War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0208 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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Kansas Cavalry, and in compliance with orders from General Granger report to you.

The camp were much disturbed last night by a communication received by Colonel Alexander from yourself, on which he issued an order to strike tents and move baggage to rear. I did not do so, but made preparations to meet an attack. There was no disturbance during the night. My command was so stationed as to guard the roads from Booneville east through Jumpertown to the main crossing of the Hatchie and north above the region of Kossuth. Both regiments had been out with their entire force and are still sent from camp. I have no information which leads me to believe we shall have an immediate attack, though I shall expect one when the enemy learns our situation. Their pickets have been on Twenty Mile Creek for six weeks past. I will try to visit you to-day, though may not be able.

I am, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. L. LEE,

Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade, Cavalry Division.

IUKA, September 8, 1862.

General GRANT:

Hamilton telegraphs news from a deserter that Price and Van Dorn have united for a move into Kentucky, but he thinks they are moving on Corinth. They are working on the railroad. Would it be well for us to take up the rails and haul them off for a mile or two and break up the track-bed down toward Booneville?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General.

IUKA, September 8, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

The information I sent you is all I have at present. All things considered, it would seem probable that Van Dorne, Breckinridge, and Price should combine, and if we withdraw from the east should hold us in check and move on Buell or make an attempt to dislodge us, if they think they have the power. The best route for them, all things considered, is via Ripley and Chewalla if they have transportation; the railroad by Rienzi is the next best. If we have our troops in hand so as to meet this attack we shall be able to whip them and crush them out. If they move east we shall be able to counteract them. If they should try to penetrate between us and Memphis and cross the Hatchie it would be the best for us of all; they would never return.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

IUKA, September 8, 1862.

General GRANT:

Colonel Mower telegraphed that Colonel Hatch's cavalry reports the enemy in force at Twenty Mile Creek. What force I do not know.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.