War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0203 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HUMBOLDT, TENN., September 5, 1862.

General LOGAN:

Rebels attacked Burnt Bridge this morning, set it on fire, burned camp, and retreated at 4 o'clock. The men put it out, and train is here. I have sent my cavalry after them. Can't you cut them off?

GEORGE E. BRYANT,

Colonel, Commanding.

TRENTON, September 5, 1862.

General LOGAN:

The rebels came from Poplar Corners last night at 2 o'clock, and probably returned that way. Can you send your cavalry to head them while I follow?

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Bethel, Tenn., September 5, 1862.

General JOHN A. LOGAN:

All is quiet. Work going on vigorously. Information as to the enemy so conflicting I am in uncertainty. Scouts report them on Hatchie, nearly 15 miles from here. Some say a large force; others say small.

Have out scouts to-night to know.

I. N. HAYNIE,

Colonel, Commanding.

COLUMBUS, September 5, 1862.

General GRANT:

Am I to consider the Thirteenth Wisconsin Volunteers, all of which, except the company at Hickman, part sent to Smithland and Fort Henry, and also Captain Stenbeck's battery of artillery, sent by sections to the same points, as out of my command? The Seventy-sixth Illinois is now armed with the captured Enfield rifles. Major Bigney, commanding at Smithland, telegraphs the guerrilla chief, Johnson, has taken Uniontown and Caseyville and now threatens Smithland. The major asks for cavalry to attack and pursue. I have directed him to mount his infantry as far as practicable.

It is said that 600 horses are at Smithland intended for Buell's army. Ought they not to be removed to safer point, as they cannot be sent forward?

I. F. QUINBY,

Brigadier-General.

RIENZI, September 5, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

Your dispatches received. Granger moves one brigade to-morrow. Hamilton occupies this with two regiments, which come in to-morrow. I am told old Buford learned and blabbed our movements to Major Alger. This is so.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.