War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0180 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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the army, without a permit. I will not allow my private judgment, however strongly it may condemn unrestricted traffic with the South, to interfere with orders unofficially. I cannot discourage it.

I. F. QUINBY,

Brigadier-General.

BETHEL, TENN., August 18, 1862.

Captain R. R. TOWNERS, Jackson:

We have captured 17 prisoners and 14 horses. What shall I do with them? Answer.

I. N. HAYNIE,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF JACKSON,

Jackson, Tenn., August 18, 1862.

Colonel I. N. HAYNIE, Bethel:

Send prisoners and horses by rail under guard to this place. If you can't send the horses by rail turn them over to your quartermaster to be accounted for as other property.

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, DISTRICT OF JACKSON,

Jackson, Tenn., August 18, 1862.

Colonel E. S. DENNIS,

Commanding Post at Estanaula:

SIR: A report has reached General McClernand, and has been transmitted to these headquarters, that a rebel force of cavalry are about crossing at Green's Ferry, 15 miles northwest of Brownsville. To guard against surprise you will detach one regiment of infantry and two companies of cavalry and order them to proceed to Brownsville and remain at that place for such a length of time as you can ascertain the reliability of the above report and in your judgment shall be deemed best. If possible, you will transport the infantry in wagons.

By order of Brigadier-General Logan, commanding post.

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Trenton, Tenn., August 19, 1862.

Captain M. ROCHESTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Columbus, Ky.:

I have had my cavalry out day and night for two weeks past after different rebel bands, and in this way have so far kept them down and prevented them from joining their forces. I have not reported all the movements but only results, which I suppose the general prefers. The cavalry keep on their track, but it is hard work to catch them. These swamps and canebrakes are almost impenetrable, and when they once get in them it is useless to hunt farther. So far what fights we have had have been decisive and greatly in our favor. I have now some 100 horses and mules taken from them, besides a large number of arms. I