War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0177 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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[AUGUST 17, 1862. - From Grant to Buell see Series I, Vol. XVI,

Part II, p. 355.]

ROSECRANS', August 17, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

GENERAL: Under the last instructions from you I shall direct Stanley to occupy at Tuscumbia and Iuka; Paine to cross at Tuscumbia, Courtland and Decatur, Mitchell to cross at Eastport. This will detach the First and Fourth Divisions of the Army of the Mississippi at Farmington and this place. Will require the troops I spoke of at Danville. This army will then extend from Rienzi to Tuscumbia, a distance of 50 miles front, while your entire corps will extend a distance of 30 miles northwestward. A small army covering a front of 80 miles parallel with the enemy's front.

A speedy remedy must be applied or a bad result must be expected.

W. S. ROSECRANS

Brigadier-General.

ROSECRANS', August 17, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

Have instructed Paine and Mitchell to examine and prepare for crossing, the former at Florence, Courtland, and Decatur, the latter at Eastport; to observe the utmost secrecy and report to me fully without delay. In my instructions do you wish me to say they are detached from this army and will report from Athens to General Buell, or that they will continue a part of this army on detached service, and render reports as usual to these headquarters? Granger reports the arrival of fifteen rebel regiments, 6,000 men, at Guntown within the last two days. Will the troops I asked for be sent him, and will Danville be occupied by a regiment from Davies' command?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

ROSECRANS', August 17, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

The Mackerel-I mean Union Brigade-reported to General Granger, 520. Three hundred for duty advanced as far as Danville, where they bivouacked for the night. They attacked the pigs of Danville, deploying skirmishers for that purpose from the flanks of their column who opened a sharp fire and brought eight of the hairy rascals to the ground before Colonel Tinkham, commanding Twenty-sixth [Illinois], stationed at Danville, arrived and informed the commander of the brigade that these natives were non-combatants, as loyal as possible considering their limited information. The brigade awaits orders there. General Granger by our move loses regiments and battery. Danville covers the crossing of the Tuscumbia in front of Oglesby's camp. It seems to me, general, it would be best to order Granger another regiment, and direct Davies moreover to occupy Danville, which protects the bridge-crossing both of the common and rail road; moreover covers the larger opening on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad left by vacating our camp. Please give the necessary orders.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.

12 R. R.- VOL. XVII, PT. II.