War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0136 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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JACKSON, July 29, 1862.

General McCLERNAND, Bolivar:

Colonel Hogg is here with cavalry. Where shall I order him?

JOHN A. LOGAN,

Brigadier-General.

BOLIVAR, July 29, 1862.

General LOGAN, Jackson:

Let Colonel Hogg join Major Wallace and Stewart by the most direct route and move from Brownsville toward Toone's Station, so as to be in supporting distance of this place if the enemy should be approaching, which I now doubt.

JOHN A. McCLERNAND,

Major-General, Commanding.

CORINTH, MISS., July 30, 1862. (Received 8 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Commander-in-Chief:

General information obtained by Colonel Sheridan, who has been far to the front and right for several days, shows that Bragg has made headquarters at Rome. Most of the troops from Saltillo and Tupelo have gone to Chattanooga by rail. Wagons move across the country to Rome. Cheatham and Withrs have gone west. Price is in command in Mississippi; headquarters at Holly Springs, with force at Grand Junction. Had I not better move Ord's entire command to Bolivar, one division of Rosecrans' to Corinth, and drive the force in front south? they cannot number to exceed 10,000.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

JACKSON, TENN., July 30, 1862-2 a. m.

Colonel HOGG, Commanding Detachment:

Major Stewart has just arrived. He was attacked close to Denmark this evening by Jackson's cavalry, some 300 or 400 strong, and defeated. His loss is considerable in killed, wounded, and prisoners. He thinks the force is still close there.

It is impossible for any of his men to move to your support in their present condition. He is of the opinion that you had better move in direction of ferry or crossing in direction of Medon, where you can have support of infantry. I have two companies at Medon.

I hope you will move cautiously in whatever direction you go, as a defeat of your force would now insure an attack upon the road at different points. If you think proper you can move so as to watch the crossings of Hatchie, not too far, from where you can give information of a superior force. In fact you can judge best of matters yourself, as you can see the face of the country and can judge of the enemy. I am of opinion that the enemy will have support from nearly all of the citizens in that country. Send my orderlies back and let me know in what direction you move.

JOHN A. LOGAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.