War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0114 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE, Corinth, Miss., July 23, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, Washington, D. C.:

Since you have left here the greatest vigilance has been kept up by our cavalry to the front, but nothing absolutely certain of the movements of the enemy has been learned. It is certain, however, that a movement has taken place from Tupelo, in what direction or for what purpose is not so certain. Deserters and escaped prisoners concur in this statement, but all concurring so nearly I doubt whether they have not been misled with the view of having information reach us. It would seem from these statements that a large force moved on the 7th of this month toward Chattanooga; that Price was at Tupelo on the 17th, and made speech to his command, promising to take them back to Missouri through Kentucky; that his ordnance and provision train had moved westward with 17 days' rations, and he has likely followed ere this.

I do not regard this information of special value, except as giving an idea of points to watch and see if these statements are verified.

The changes directed by you before leaving here have all been made. Morgan's division has relieved Thomas. Sherman and Hurlbut have reached Memphis, and the entire Charleston and Memphis road is abandoned by us west of here, except at Chewalla, and a force yet retained at Grand Junction. Should anything occur within this district of a startling or important nature I will inform you by telegraph.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FIFTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE, Memphis, July 23, 1862.

Dr. E. S. PLUMMER AND OTHERS,

Physicians in Memphis, Signers to a Petition:

GENTLEMEN: I have this moment received your communication, and assure you that it grieves my heart thus to be the instrument of adding to the seeming cruelty and hardship of this unnatural war.

On my arrival here I found my predessor (General Hovey) had issued an order permitting the departure South of all persons subject to the conscript law of the Southern Confederacy. Many applications have been made to me to modify this order, but I regarded it as a condition-precedent by which I was bound in honor, and therefore I have made no changes or modifications, nor shall I determine what action I shall adopt in relation to persons unfriendly to our cause who remain after the time limited by General Hovey's order has expired. It is now sunset, and all who have not availed themselves of General Hovey's authority and who remain in Memphis are supposed to be loyal and true men.

I will only say that I cannot allow the personal convenience of even a large class of ladies to influence me in my determination to make Memphis a safe place of operations for an army, and all people who are unfriendly should forthwith prepare to depart in such direction as I may hereafter indicate.

Surgeons are not liable to be made prisoners of war, but they should not reside within the lines of an army which they regard as hostile. The situation would be too delicate.

I am, with great respect, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.