War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0107 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Trenton, Tenn., July 20, 1862.

Captain M. ROCHESTER, Asst. Adjt. General, Columbus, Ky.:

There appears to be a general uprising among the guerrillas along the Obion and Hatchie Rivers. The force that threatened Humboldt has been driven south toward Gordonsville, and Brigadier-General Logan has sent his forces after them. The force at Key Corners I have sent five companies of cavalry after, and the force 15 miles west of Troy I have sent three companies of cavalry after. None of the bands had rendezvoused over twenty-four hours before I was aware of their movements, and I immediately sent out my cavalry from all points with instructions to attack, no matter where found or in what force, knowing that quick movements and bold attacks is the most efficient method of breaking them up.

I informed General Logan of the position of those south of us and ordered Colonel Bryant to march on them. They fled the moment Colonel Bryant moved, to escape General Logan's forces. They report that band as a portion of Jackson's cavalry.

I telegraphed in relation to horseshoes. It is almost impossible for me to get along without them.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

JULY 20, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

A dispatch just received informs me that Clarksville is taken by rebels, and that a force, from 600 to 800, is now moving on Fort Henry. Re-enforcements are asked for, but I do not have them to spare. Guerrilla bands are forming through Western Kentucky and Tennessee, and unless they are promptly attack and dispersed they will give us great trouble.

With two good regiments of cavalry, in addition to the infantry and artillery I now have, they could be kept down and the enlisting for the regular rebel service could be suppressed.

I. F. QUINBY,

Brigadier-General.

ROSECRANS' HEADQUARTERS, July 20, 1862.

General GRANT:

GENERAL: From a gentleman whom I know, who was imprisoned by the rebels and escaped after two unsuccessful attempts, bringing with him the irons with which he was manacled at Tupelo, I learn the following important facts:

Bragg with a large force left Tupelo on the 7th, the date of his flag-of-truce letter to General Halleck, for the east, marching by Peeksville toward Chattanooga. A small force left Tupelo for Mobile July 1. There has been additional forces sent from Tupelo to Saltillo. Bradfute's cavalry is at Fulton. Thomas Jordan commands at Saltillo. Price is at Priceville, 6 miles east of Tupelo. A brigade is half west of Tupelo. No troops any farther west. Total force in that vicinity will not exceed 20,000. No troops were seen by him north of New Albany except a few strolling cavalry.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Brigadier-General.