War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0081 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS, Number 49. Moscow, July 7, 1862.

Stealing, robbery, and pillage has become so common in this army that it is a disgrace to any civilized people.

No officer other than the general commanding will grant passes beyond the line of pickets, and he will grant none except on extraordinary occasions.

Brigadiers may send out as heretofore the regular foraging parties with guard, strictly according to orders already issued.

Major Gibson will detail a patrol daily of an officer and 10 wounded men, who will patrol the country round about camp. This patrol will fire upon any party engaged in robbery and pillage, or who attempt to escape. All found outside the lines will be delivered to the provost-marshal, who will put them on bread and water until relieved by the commanding general.

This demoralizing and disgraceful practice of pillage must cease, else the country will rise on us and justly shoot us down like dogs and wild beasts.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION, Number 111. Moscow, July 7, 1862.

Brigadier General J. W. Denver will guard the main road west. Brigadier General M. L. Smith will keep one regiment on guard at Ammon's Bridge, over Wolf River, between Moscow and La Grange, to be relieved as he may judge best.

Colonel McDowell, commanding Second Brigade, will guard the railroad, as before the march to Coldwater.

Major Taylor, chief of artillery, will designate a section of artillery to report to General Smith for duty at Ammon's Bridge.

By order of Major General W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Trenton, Tenn., July 8, 1862.

Captain M. ROCHESTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Columbus, Ky.:

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the work done by the troops under your command on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad from Columbus to Humboldt:

At Columbus the overflow of the Mississippi River had damaged and destroyed a portion of the track. This was railed and a new track run to the water's edge for the purpose of unloading cars. At the crossing of Little Obion River was the first bridge out, formerly a Howe's truss, with 90 feet span, the entire wreck of which, bolted together, had to be taken out of the stream. It was replaced by a single bent trestle 110 feet long and 30 feet rise. The danger of a single bent trestle of such light was overcome by placing a crib in the center of the stream, with stringers from bank to bank, on which was built the trestle-work, all above the common stage of water. The next bridge

6 R R-VOL XVII, PT II