War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0037 Chapter XXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Accompanying the railroad train was a letter to yourself and one to General Sherman, which I am very sorry to have (these letters), particularly the former, fall into the hands of the rebels. Colonel Griegson, commander of the cavalry sent from here, has just returned from Germantown and discredits the reports of the captured of our trains. He says that Jackson's men have been hovering along the line of the railroad in squads burning cotton; that cotton was burned yesterday at three or four places visited by him.

An impression seems to prevail here that a force is collecting 35 miles southeast from here for the purpose of making an attack on this place and burning it.

My force now here is small, having sent two regiments to re-enforce Colonel Fitch and to protect five steamers loaded with supplies for General Curtis' command. Three steamers are now ready to start. I have had precautionary measures taken to protect the pilots from musketry.

I reported to you the effective strength of this command, but you may not have received it. As my office and quarters have been moved to the suburbs of the city, and all the records are there, I cannot now give you the exact strength. I believe the entire effective force left, after re-enforcing Colonel Fitch, is about 4,000. It seems to me that one of the divisions of the Army of the Tennessee now at Corinth should move west, so as to strengthen this point by another division. This would enable me to hold Hernando or some suitable point on the railroad to Grenada.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

LA GRANGE, June 26, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The enemy have not pressed any nearer. My cavalry pickets are 6 miles out, and not disturbed last night or this morning. They are fortifying at Coldwater and impressing all the negroes. There is a strong stampede of them into my lines, and I allow them to pass north to cut off their labor. They claim that in a day or two they will be 30,000 strong, under Breckinridge, Van Dorn, and Price. Refugees say they will be compelled to make a stand there to save utter demoralization. The cavalry moving from Ripley will stampede them, if in force, especially if Wallace threatens their left. McClearnand's force, when it arrives, will secure my left and allow me to amass my force here. I have not heard from General Sherman to-day. We want a machine and operator here, as this one moves to-day.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Brigadier-General.

LA GRANGE, June 26, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. McCLEARNAND:

Your re-enforcement will be in time. There are 15,000 men between Holly Springs and Coldwater. They are fortifying and must be whipped. So, please God, there will be a fight soon.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Brigadier-General.