War of the Rebellion: Serial 025 Page 0018 Chapter XXIX. WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS.

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SAINT LOUIS, June 20, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

I leave for Washington in the morning.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, June 20, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK:

The Secretary of War telegraphs me that he desires to see me in Washington for a day or two if it will not interfere with your plans by going. I may be detained a few days longer, not more than that. Shall I go? Please answer immediately.

JNO. POPE,

Major-General.

CORINTH, June 20, 1862.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

Our forces under Major-General Sherman have occupied Holly Springs, pushing his cavalry as far south as the Tallahatchie River and destroying several railroad bridges. The enemy having appeared in considerable force he fell back to Holly Springs. From captured telegrams it was ascertained that the machinery for manufacturing arms at that place has been removed at Atlanta, Ga. Railroad will be opened to Memphis by Monday and to Columbus by Wednesday of next week. It is reported that Beauregard turned over his command to Bragg on the 15th, but all deserters and negroes say that no troops have been sent south or east. This is positively asserted by a servant of the Confederate master of transportation, who left the enemy's headquarters at Tupelo on Sunday last.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. FIFTH DIVISION, ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

La Grange, Tenn., June 20, 1862.

General HALLECK, Corinth, Miss.:

I am afraid of being caught on the question of rations. My orders were for twenty days' from Chewalla. This may prove a little short, but must last till the 30th. I have, say, 14,000 men, including Hurlbut, who eat near 20 wagon loads a day. It is 50 miles to memphis direct and 65 around by Somerville, the only safe way for a small escort. It will take seven days at the best for a wagon train to make the round trip. I think I can get the track through in all next week, but it is a blind chance, too uncertain to risk, as my facilities for work and progress are of the commonest kind. If you would send me a telegraphic order to the commanding officer at Memphis to work out of meet us our progress would be double. i can send such an order through by courier.

Might it not be well for me to move the bulk of my division half way in, then establish our system of supplies, and return to this neighborhood?

You know that Holly Springs is some 10 miles nearer Memphis than the Junction, and all roads to and from North Mississippi center in