War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0552 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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on this side and Napier's also. I need no more re-enforcements, and can surely save all your rear communications this way. I have ordered a cavalry dash at midnight on their position.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General GRANT.

JANUARY 1, 1863.

General G. M. DODGE and C. S. HAMILTON:

Following dispatch just received:

PARKER'S CROSS-ROADS, BETWEEN LEXINGTON AND HUNTINGTON, December 31, 1862-6 o'clock p. m.

Major-General GRANT:

We have achieved a glorious victory. We met Forrest, 7,000 strong. After a contest of four hours, completely routed him with great slaughter. We have captured six guns, over 300 prisoners, over 350 horses, a large number of wagons and teams, and large quantity of small-arms. Colonel Napier killed; Colonel Cox and Major Strange, Forrest's adjutant, and one aide-de-camp, and a number of other officers captured. Colonel Rinaker slightly wounded. I will telegraph particulars of our loss.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

JACKSON, January 2, 1863.

Flag of truce came into Jackson last night. This morning it was started out on Trenton, with orders to proceed via Trenton to Tennessee River. This evening the same flag of truce is found on Lexington road following our troops. I had it brought back and now await your orders as to whether it shall be sent via Cairo to Vicksburg or south through Corinth. The rebel loss, as estimated by Forrest, is 1,500 men killed, wounded, and missing. Their dead, I have good reason to believe, is 200; their prisoners over 400. My loss will not exceed 100 killed and wounded; prisoners, 63.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General GRANT.

JACKSON, TENN., January 2, 1863-3 p. m.

Just arrived here from Lexington. Left Colonel Lawler with 3,000 men (old troops) and eight pieces of artillery to follow the retreating enemy to the river. Forrest' s army is completely broken up. They are scattered over the country without ammunition. We need a good cavalry regiment to go through the country and pick them up. I left a regiment at the battle ground and two at Huntington. Captured six pieces of artillery (the enemy burst over nine caissons), over 400 prisoners, 500 horses, a portion of his train, all his train, all his ammunition but one wagon, three wagon loads of small-arms, and a large quantity of our captured clothing. Will report further when I receive reports from brigade commanders.

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General GRANT.