War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0487 Chapter XXIX. MISSISSIPPI CENTRAL RAILROAD.

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cers, principally due to the cavalry under Colonel Lee. We have 2 wounded and the enemy 15. The inclosed sketch* will give you an idea of our position and the manner in which the rebel cavalry were captured.

Colonel Lee kept on the straight road past A some distance and made a detour around to B, coming in on the flank of the rebel column as it was being driven back from A by the infantry of Colonel Johnson's brigade. General Quinby has not yet come up, though I am expecting him every moment.

There reports as to whether the rebels have left Holly Springs and Coldwater are very conflicting. Some say the infantry has all gone; others that they are there in strong force. The prisoners generally say that we will be whipped to-morrow, and that if we expect to get to Coldwater without a heavy fight we are very much mistaken. A man told Colonel Johnson this evening that the order was given to evacuate Holly Springs, but that some general came up and put a stop to it, saying they would fight there; they could not better their position by falling back. Colonel Lee is in advance and may report something more definite; if so, I will let you know immediately.

Very respectfully,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

Major-General GRANT.

LAMAR, November 8-10.30 p.m.

We have captured 40 more of the enemy and killed 16 that we know of. Colonel Lee's pickets are in Hudsonville. The enemy know we are out with a force, which they estimate at 15,000. It is still uncertain whether the enemy are in strong force at Coldwater. Colonel Lee is instructed to push forward cautiously in the morning, and if possible ascertain what is there.+

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

Major-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

La Grange, Tenn., January 13, 1863.

GENERAL: Having just seen in one of the late Memphis papers rumors to the effect that Holly Springs was burned by our troops and that a large rebel force followed us, entering the town shortly after we left, I will simply state the facts in the case to show that these reports are all untrue.

On Friday evening after you left I telegraphed to the train master at Grand Junction to ascertain how many trains he could send down the next day, and he replied that he would have three in Holly Springs before noon. These I thought sufficient to carry off all the property, and accordingly issued orders for the ammunition train and quartermaster's trains to start for La Grange at 7 a.m. Saturday morning, escorted by two regiments of infantry and Major Bush's battalion Second Illinois Cavalry.

Learning that numerous threats had been made to burn the town I sent word to Colonel Loomis to double the guards and exercise in -

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*Not found.

+See also Grant's report of November.

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