War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0448 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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was the result of the ignorance of the roads and neglect of giving timely orders?

Answer. No such order was given.

Question. Were you absent from General Van Dorn any length of time from the time the army left Davis' Mill until it reached Corinth and from Corinth to Holly Springs; if not, do you know whether or not General Van Dorn was at any time intoxicated?

Answer. I was not absent from General Van Dorn any length of time except once, and that was about three hours, and I did not know of his taking a drink of liquor but once during the whole time, and that he was in no manner under the influence of liquor.

Colonel J. T. WARD, volunteer aide to General Van Dorn's staff, duly sworn.

By DEFENDANT:

Question. Please state to the court how long have known General Van Dorn and under what circumstances and at what places you have been with him.

Answer. I have known General Van Dorn since January, 1857. He was commanding officer of the military posts in Texas and in Indian Territory; I was sutler. I was also with him in an expedition north of Red River. He had a fight at the Wichita Village with the Indians. I saw General Van Dorn, daily from 1857 to 1861; since then, from April, 1861, to July; from August, 1862, until the present time.

Question. Will you please state whether or not General Van Dorn was addicted to drinking, or if he was or was ever considered a drunkard during that time?

Answer. No, he never was. From July, 1857, to December, 1860, I never saw General Van Dorn take a drink, not even a drink of wine. Since that time I have seen him take one or two drinks, but never knew of his being drunk.

Question. Did you move with the army on Corinth?

Answer. I moved with the army on Corinth.

Question. Were you frequently in the presence of General Van Dorn on that expedition?

Answer. I was with General Van Dorn all the time of his move on Corinth.

Question. Did you see him on the battle-field of Corinth?

Answer. I was with him on the battle-field, except when absent carrying orders.

Question. If so, state whether he was intoxicated or in any degree under the influence of liquor.

Answer. I know that he was not drunk nor under the influence of liquor, either on the move to Corinth or on the battle-field or on the retreat from Corinth.

JAMES P. MAJOR, Lieutenant-colonel of artillery, acting chief of artillery on General Van Dorn's staff, sworn.

By DEFENDANT:

Question. State how long you have known General Van Dorn and under what circumstances and at what places you have been with him.

Answer. I have known him since the spring of 1857. I know him intimately and severed with him in the old U. S. Army in the same regiment, and on detached duty was immediately connected with him for over a year as his adjutant. At the breaking out of this war I was gained to his command in Texas and was with him about three months, during which time he captured the Federal forces in Texas and on the past of Texas. After the battle of Elkhorn I again came under his command