War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0410 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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ledge that their advance upon our left and the right of the enemy's battery attracted a portion of its fire, was in concert with our advance, greatly facilitated its capture, and entitled them to full share of the honor.

I would here express my obligations to Captain Fall and Lieutenant Anderson, Ayres, and Bedrtrand, of my staff, for the prompt and intelligent manner in which they executed my orders.

Lieutenant Sweaney, in command of the Hudson Battery, attache to my brigade, had opportunity to participate in the action, but executed quickly and cheerfully every order addressed to him. Casualties on the field and upon the retreat:

Casualties on the field and upon the retreat:

Killed....................................... 25

Wounded...................................... 117

Missing...................................... 83

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Total........................................ 225

The dense forest of heavy timber and thick undergrowth under cover of which the brigade advanced until to within a few rods of the enemy's battery accounts for the comparatively small number of killed and wounded.

A. RUST,

Brigadier General, Commanding 1st Brigadier, 1st Div., Army of the Dist. of Miss.

Lieutenant-Colonel IVY,

Assistant Adjutant-General, &c.

Numbers 117.

Report of Brigadier General John b. Villepigue, C. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND BRIGADE, THE FIRST DIVISION,

ARMY OF THE DISTRICT OF MISSISSIPPI,

October 14, 1862.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Second Brigade in the actions before Corinth on the 3rd and 4th instant:

In approaching Corinth on the 3rd instant the Second Brigade was in advance. An outpost of the enemy was met about 5 miles from the fortress and driven into the other entrenchments without much opposition. On reaching a creek about 3 miles from the fortress and quite near the outer entrenchments the march of the column was delayed for some time by the enemy's artillery and from the bridge over the creek having been destroyed. The passage, however, was effected in good time, and the enemy until the other brigades of the division had crossed and taken up their positions. The whole division then advanced, the Second Brigade being on the extreme left. The enemy were driven steadily before us until we came in view of the outer entrenchments, or rifle-pits. Our onward course was here checked for a short time in consequence of the deadly fire of the enemy and the nature of the obstructions in front of us. After a slight pause the Thirty-third Mississippi, Colonel D. W. Hurst commanding charged the entrenchments and drove the enemy from then in gallant style. In consequence of the dense thickness of the undergrowth