War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0262 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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came that they were coming. We rallied about 18 men and repulsed them, killing 4 and wounding 3 others. Our loss was 1 teamster, wounded in the thigh severely.

Respectfully,

H. F. OLDS,

Regimental Wagon-Master, Union Brigade.

It gives me great pleasure to bear testimony to the gallant conduct of Brigadier-Generals Hackleman and Oglesby on the field. Colonel Baldwin being wounded early in the action, presents his own record. Colonel Sweeny, commanding First Brigade, behaved in the most gallant manner throughout, and should be immediately promoted. Colonel Du Bois, though a very superior officer, had but little opportunity to display his abilities. Captain Lovell behaved in the most gallant and daring manner, rallying the reserve and bringing them forward to the charge; turning artillerist at a critical moment with great effect; carrying orders though showers of bullets, and in various ways proving himself a brave and useful man. I should be glad to see him in command of a brigade. Colonel Rice I wish particularly to mention for gallant and meritorious conduct on the field. Colonel Mersy, of the Ninth Illinois, when Oglesby's brigade was attacked by an overwhelming force, made a splendid movement with his regiment, which saved much, but at the cost of many of his officers and men. Colonel Babcock and Lieutenant-Colonel Rowett,of the Seventh Illinois; Lieutenant-Colonel Swarthout, of the Fiftieth Illinois, and Major Foursse, of the Fifty-seventh Illinois, behaved in a gallant manner. Colonel Burke, commanding Fourteenth Missouri (Western Sharpshooters), of this division, although not under my command, proved himself to be a brave and gallant soldier, having his horse shot seven times while in command of skirmishers in the enemy's advance. Captain Hanna, as usual, showed himself to be a brave and gallant man and worthy of promotion; also Lieutenant-Colonel Parrott, Seventh Iowa Volunteers. Lieutenant Miller, of the Twelfth Illinois, most gallantly seized the colors of the Fifty-second Illinois when the color-bearer was shot down during he charge to recapture our line, and placed them upon the earthwork. Acting Lieutenant George N. Barr, Fifty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Du Bois mentions as having particularly distinguished himself.

The color and standard bearers of this division and the color guard performed their duty and showed great bravery, nor was there a color or standard of this division in the hands of the enemy save one, that of the Union Brigade, which was captured, but most gallantly retaken by Lieutenant Maxwell.

All the artillery officers, including Major Stone, chief of artillery, and the men behaved in a most cool and judicious manner, sustaining the reparation gained at Wilson's Creek. They proved a most efficient arm, having fired during the two days' engagement 2,155 rounds of ammunition.

I could extend the list to many other brave and gallant men and should scarce know where to stop, and with the exception of the fault which they committed but speedily rectified, they behaved throughout the two days' action in a most brave and gallant manner.

To Him who guides the destinies of men and nations may all praise be given for our victories, and may those who hold temporary power under Him freshen the laurels of the brave dead and spear the fame of the Him freshen the laurels of the brave dead and spread the fame of the wounded living.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. A. DAVIES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Second Div., Army of West Tenn.

Colonel KENNETT,

Chief of Staff.