War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0165 Chapter XXIX. CORINTH.

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telegraph line to be extended to Pocahontas and repaired to Grand Junction. Please order railroad to be repaired to Pocahontas and Grand Junction. You artemis informed as to my having communicated with Sherman, as I have never presumed to do so except so far, after having been informed by you as to his whereabouts, I sent word to Hurlbut wishing him to tell Sherman where we and asking cooperation. I should not think of communicating with him in any official way except through you. Please order a large number of cavalry and artillery horses to be ready; many are now needed. Cavalry has suffered very severely by last week's labor and for forage.

W. S. ROSECRANS.

Major-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Jacinto, October 9, 1862.

MAJOR: The dispatch of the major-general commanding, dared the 8th instant, directing our return to Corinth, is just received. I shall take the most prompt and efficient measures to carry the orders into execution with as little prejudice as practicable to the interest of the service.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major RAWLINS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

RIPLEY, October 9, 1862-9.45 p. m.

I consider it nearly certain that Tilghman with the prisoners has gone to Holly Springs and that Price has gone to join him. I shall soon hear further information. I will be in Corinth soon with big show of remaining with all my force. I will take immediate measures to put it in the best state of defense to be left while I reorganize my forces.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major-General GRANT.

CORINTH, October 11, 1862.

Our movement will be completed by to-morrow night unless some extraordinary accidents. Your General Orders, 88, received. The part expressing the hope that good feeling will exist between Ord's command and my own amazes me. So far as I know there was nothing even to suggest the thought that it might be otherwise. Under such circumstances the report is to be regretted, because our troops, knowing there was no foundation for it in them, will be led to think there is some elsewhere.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Major-General GRANT.