War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0163 Chapter XXIX. CORINTH.

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CRUM'S MILL BRIDGE,

October 6, 1862-6.30.

From best information rebel rear guard passed Hatchie this morning before 10 o'clock; burned the bridge. They are aiming for Holly Springs. Hurlbut reports himself too much cut up to purpose. McPhersons' brigade and McKean's and Stanley's divisions here; Hamilton 4 miles off. Bridge built; part of the troops across; we shall peruse them.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Major-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Jonesborough, October 7, 1862.

Do not, I entreat you, call Hurlbut back; let him send away his wounded. It surely is easier to move the sick and wounded than to remove both. I propose to push the enemy, so that we need but the most trifling guards behind us. Our advance is beyond Ruckersville. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie Crossing on the Ripley road to-night. A very intelligent, honest young Irishman, ambulance-driver, deserted from the rebels, says that they wished to go together to railroad near Tupelo, where they will meet the 9,000 exchanged prisoners, but he says they are much scattered and demoralized. They have much artillery.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

Major-General GRANT.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Jonesborough, October 7, 1862-midnight.

GENERAL: Your 8.30 p. m. received. Our troops occupy Ripley. I most deeply dissent from your views as to the manner of pursuing. We have defeated, routed, and demoralized the army which holds the Lower Mississippi Valley. We have the two railroads leading down toward the Gulf though the most productive parts of the State, into which we can now peruse them with safety. The effect of our return to old position will be to pen them up in the only corn country they have west of Alabama, including the Tuscumbia Valley, and to permit them to recruit their forces, advance and occupy their old ground, reducing us to the occupation f a defensive position, barren and worthless, with a long front, over which they can harass us until bad weather prevents an effectual advance except on the railroads, when time, fortifications, and rolling stock will again render them superior to us. Our force, including what you have with Hurlbut, will garrison Corinth and Jackson and enable us to push them. Our advance will cover even Holly Springs, which would be ours when we want it. All that is needful is to continue pursuing and whip them. We have whipped, and should now push to the wall and capture all the rolling stock of their railroads. Bragg's army alone west of Alabama River and occupying Mobile could repair the damage we have it in our power to do them. If, after considering these matters, you still consider the order for my return to Corinth expedient I will obey it and abandon the chief fruits of a victory, but I beseech you bend everything to push them while they are