War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0126 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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Wounded

Command Killed Danger- Severely Slightly Total

ously

General 1 ........ ........ ........ .......

officers*

First Brigade ....... ........ 2 8 10

Second 63 37 139 127 303

Brigade

Third Brigade ....... ........ ....... ........ .......

Fourth 22 12 35 48 95

Brigade

Total 86 49 176 183 408

Left at Iuka Left on the road

Command Total killed Wounded Sick Wounded Sick

and wounded

General ............. ....... ...... ....... ......

officers*

First Brigade 10 1 15 ....... 11

Second 366 222 36 ....... ......

Brigade

Third Brigade ............. ....... 40 ....... 59

Fourth 117 63 38 ....... ......

Brigade

Total 493 286 129 ....... 70

*Brigadier General Henry Little.

The Second Brigade went into battle with an aggregate of 1,774 and the Fourth with and aggregate of 1,405, as per reports. The regiments which suffered the most are the Third Louisiana Infantry, the First Texas Legion (dismounted cavalry), and the Third Texas (dismounted cavalry).

I transmit herewith reports of brigades, regiments, and companies, as far as could be obtained, and from which details which cannot enter into this report can be gathered. All necessary reports from the different departments of the division are made out and are being sent to the proper chiefs at army headquarters.

When all have done their duty, when officers and soldiers have displayed unparalleled bravery, determination, and fortitude, no discrimination can be made and none will be made in this report. Under my personal supervision no one faltered, no one hesitated to meet the foe, even in a hand-to-hand conflict if required. I must, however, put into the position of brave and true men the small numbers of the Fourteenth and Seventeenth Arkansas Regiments of Infantry, of the Second Brigade, upon whom past circumstances had cast a doubt. Nobly, heroically have they proven themselves true patriots and brave soldiers. They have placed themselves above suspicion and accusation.

When time will permit more detailed reports will be given in for the satisfaction of the major-general commanding in justice to all parties.

Of my personal brigade staff who were on the field during the action, Captain W. D. Hardeman, assistant adjutant-general, and Captain L. S. Talbott, inspector-general, were active and diligent in the discharge of their duties. The first was of very efficient service, and, by his intelligence in carrying orders, attending to their execution, encouraging the troops, and by his gallantry, deserves special mention. Captain Talbott evinced both gallantry and cool intelligence. The other officers of my brigade staff were necessarily absent attending to their respective duties.

Of the division staff of Brigadier-General Little, Mr. E. J. Cunningham, volunteer aide, and Captain John G. Kelly, inspector-general, joined me and did good service. The entire staff reported as soon as practicable and were prompt and efficient on the march to this point.

The missing of the division are not fully accounted for, many stragglers on the wayside coming in hourly.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS HEBERT,

Brigadier General, Commanding First Div., Army of the West.