War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0118 WEST TENN. AND NORTHERN MISS. Chapter XXIX.

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Iuka, with a large force at the latter place, you gave me verbal orders to prepare all my available force, consisting of Davies', Ross', and McArthur's divisions, altogether numbering about 8,000, to move upon the enemy by the roads north of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. In addition to the verbal orders the following written instructions wee received from you:

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Corinth, Miss., September 16, 1862.

Major-General ORD, Commanding Post:

GENERAL: On the strength of Colonel Mower's telegram I deem it advisable to send our forces to within supporting distance of him. If General Ross can move his forces he had better go to Glendale, or either side of there where water can be found, and be on the alert to give assistance if requires. Captain Reynolds can furnish any teams they may require.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Corinth, Miss., September 17, 1862.

Major-General ORD, Corinth, Miss.:

GENERAL: We will get off all our forces now as rapidly as practicable. I have dispatched Rosecrans that all our movements now would be as rapid as compatible with prudence, informing him at the same time of where your troops now are and that those not yet off would be at and near Glendale to-night; you probably with them. I directed Rosecrans to give me his routes and will inform you of them. Take an operator with you, who as a pocket instrument, which can be attached to the wires any place desired, if there is such a place. I will leave to-morrow for Burnsville if to-day does not develop something to make a different plan necessary.

Respectfully, &c.,

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

The latter of these two dispatches was received about 5 p. m. on September 17. In obedience to these orders the troops which had moved up to Glendale on the 17th were moved to Burnsville on the morning of the 18th, at which place I arrived about noon and found you there. In the course of that evening dispatches were received from General Rosecrans, stating that a large portion of his command had been delayed by mistaking the route and following one of my columns and was still about 20 miles from Iuka.

Early on the morning of the 19th, by your orders, Ross' division was placed within 6 miles of Iuka, to hold the enemy's advance guard and skirmishers in check. This was on the direct or lower road, between Burnsville and Iuka. McArthur's division was ordered to advance to within a like distance of Iuka on the Eastport road, and, intelligence having been received that the enemy were making demonstrations upon Corinth from the south and west, you directed me to retain Davies' division at Burnsville, to be ready to return to Corinth by rail at a moment's notice. I made a careful reconnaissance of the enemy's front toward Corinth between 9 and 3 o'clock on that day. While making the reconnaissance, about 10 o'clock that morning, I received from you the following dispatch:

SEPTEMBER 19, 1862.

GENERAL: I send you dispatch received from Rosecrans late in the night. You will see that he is behind where we expected him. Do not be too rapid with your advance this morning, unless it should be found that the enemy are evacuating.

By order of Major-General Grant:

CLARK B. LAGOW,

Colonel and Inspector-General.

After completing the reconnaissance I returned to Burnsville about 4 p. m., and reported to you that the enemy showed a bold front to-