War of the Rebellion: Serial 024 Page 0031 Chapter XXIX. SKIRMISH AT MERIWETHER'S FERRY.

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company, with 27 horses and mules and equipments, was taken. The expedition was decidedly successful. The boat at Simon's Ferry is destroyed and that at Holton's brought down.

L. F. ROSS,

Brigadier-General.

General McCLERNAND.

AUGUST 13, 1862.-Skirmish near Medon, Tenn.

Report of Brigadier General Leonard F. Ross, U. S. Army.

BOLIVAR, August 13, 1862.

A skirmish took place at 1 o'clock to-day between a guerrilla band and a company of 18 Home Guards about 8 miles southeast of Medon, near the residence of Green Holton, and about 15 miles south of Jackson. One Union man died. Loss of enemy not known.

ROSS,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General McCLERNAND.

AUGUST 16, 1862.-Skirmish at Meriwether's Ferry, Obion River, Tenn.

Reports of Brigadier General Grenville M. Dodge, U. S. Army.

TRENTON, TENN.

Colonel Harris of the Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, with Captain Fullerton's company of the Second Illinois Cavalry, attacked a rebel force from Kentucky, 150 strong, at Meriwether's Ferry, in Dyer County, completely routing and driving them into the river. The fight lasted thirty minutes, and Captain Fullerton's officers and men fought with great gallantry and bravery. His force was only 60.

The enemy's loss was large in killed, wounded, and drowned. We took 10 prisoners, 40 horses, and a large number of arms, ammunition, &c. Our loss, Lieutenants Terry and Goodheart and 1 private killed and 6 wounded.

Several companies of cavalry from Kentucky are trying to push through south. This was the first that crossed the line. They are well armed and fought desperately.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General.

Major-General GRANT.

HDQRS. CENTRAL DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI, Trenton, Tenn., August 20, 1862.

CAPTAIN: The fight at Meriwether's Ferry was much more decisive than I telegraphed. So far as ascertained the enemy had 37 killed. We have taken 16 of their bodies out of the river. They lost everything. We got their horses, arms, and baggage. Some got away naked. Colonel Harris' conduct in the fight is spoken of highly. It was well planned and finely executed. The cavalry, after following