War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0976 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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RICHMOND, VA., October 23, 1862.

General BRAXTON BRAGG:

Colonel Walter has arrived. For conference with you the President desires, if you find it practicable to leave your army for a few days, that you will lose no time in coming here.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

KNOXVILLE, TENN., October 23, 1862.

General S. COOPER:

Your dispatch just received. Will leave for Richmond by first train to-morrow.

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT NO.2,

No. 17. Knoxville, Tenn., October 23, 1862.

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II. The Army of the Mississippi, under Lieutenant-General Polk, will proceed as soon as practicable to Murfreesborough, Tenn., and take such position in that vicinity as may seem advisable to its commander.

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By command of General Bragg:

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Chief of Staff and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY,

No. 3. Cumberland Gap, Tenn., October 23, 1862.

Soldiers of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Mississippi:

The autumn campaign in Kentucky is over. Your arduous duties as the advance and rear guard of a wash army are for the present finished. Your gallantry in action, your cheerful endurance of sufferings form hunger, fatigue, and exposure render you worthy of all commendation. For nearly two months you have scarcely for a moment been without the range to the enemy's musketry. In more than twenty pitched fights, many of which lasted throughout the day, you have successfully combated largely superior numbers of the enemy's troops of all arms. Hovering continually near their lines, you have engaged in no less than one hundred skirmishes, and upon the memorable field of Perryville, alone and unsupported, you engaged and held in check during the entire action at least two infantry divisions of the opposing army. By your gallant charges on that day you completely dispersed and routed a vastly superior force of the enemy's cavalry, driving them in confusion under their artillery and infantry supports, capturing in hand-to-hand conflicts many prisoners, horses, arms, &c. Your continual contact with the enemy has taught you to repose without fear under his guns, to fight him wherever found, and to quietly make your bivouac by the light of his camp-fires. In this continual series of combats and brilliant