War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0961 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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with you will communicate fully with General Polk. Should anything of importance occur while his infantry is with you co-operate with the officers in command of it.

Respectfully,

J. P.

[----, ---, 1862.]

General WHEELER, Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: I put a brigade at 6 o'clock to relieve yours. I send a copy of my instructions.

Yours, &c.,

J. P. McCOWN,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF EAST TENNESSEE,

Knoxville, Tenn., October 18, 1862.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

GENERAL: You telegraphed me on the 10th instant that the writ of habeas corpus was no longer suspended, the act authorizing the President to suspend it; if so, I respectfully recommend that he suspend it in this department. I have continued to enforce martial law, but the lawyers are meddling in the matter, and will produced some trouble and confusion if the writ is not suspended. Please have this acted on as soon as you can.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General, Commanding.

BARBOURSVILLE, KY., October 18, 1862 - 7 a. m.

General POLK, Commanding:

GENERAL: Agreeably to your order the left wing is here and will not move without further orders. Your order directing the destruction of tent-flies, &c., has been received and immediately issued. As most of my train is forward of this place its prompt compliance cannot be effected. As we have traveled thus far without hinderance, and as we have empty wagons to assist those which may be overloaded, I would respectfully suggest the propriety of keeping the flies, which I fear we may have difficulty in replacing. The other articles named by you are of but little weight, and if we can take them along it would be well to do so. Bragg ordered Anderson to halt yesterday until a train could pass him; consequently the rear of his column did not reach camp until 12 o'clock last night. I shall be glad to have the left wing rest to-day.

Very respectfully,

W. J. HARDEE,

Major-General.

P. S. - There is, I believe, no doubt of my ability to take forward the articles you have ordered to be destroyed. If when we reach the difficult part of the road they be found to impede us then they ought to be destroyed. If we get them to the Gap we can leave [them], for they will then be safe.

61 R R-VOL XVI, PT II