War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0949 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Big Hill, Ky., October 15, 1862.

General C. L. STEVENSON,

Commanding First Division:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of 4.30 o'clock this evening. Everything here is going on well; the wagons moving up the hill as rapidly as could be expected. General Heth is about 2 miles from this point. The general desires you not to fall back unless compelled. He feels confident of being able to resist any force the enemy can bring against him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Acting Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Two miles beyond Mount Vernon, Ky., October 15, 1862.

Colonel WHEELER, Chief of Cavalry Division:

COLONEL: By direction of the general commanding you will send forward forthwith two regiments of cavalry from your command; one of the regiments to press forward to-day to London to picket all the approaches to that place from the neighborhood of Somerset; the other to follow in rear of this column to pick up and help along all wearied and foot-sore, to spell the tired, and push forward stragglers. The general wishes this done immediately.

By order of General Bragg:

GEO. G. GARNER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

October 15, [1862]-8 a.m.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding Department No. 2:

GENERAL: The ordnance train is not yet up the Big Hill. The road is still blocked up with trains, many of which, it seems, belong to your command. General Stevenson yesterday engaged the enemy at Lancaster, trying to hold them in check. He fell back during the night, they trying to turn his position. I have little hope of saving any of the trains, and fear much of the artillery will be lost. I shall push forward the ordnance and provision trains first. I shall try to hold the enemy in check here and give myself all the time possible. I hope the Crab Orchard defile is occupied, as it gives the enemy a passage to my flank. I have given General Marshall permission to go to Pound Gap via Richmond, as it would be impossible for him to get his cavalry or artillery out by this route. Lexington is still unoccupied and the route through Pound Gap open. General Marshall feels sure he can move that way with perfect safety.

Your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.