War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0936 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Crossing Kentucky River, October 12, 1862-4 p.m.

Colonel JOHN H. MORGAN,

Commanding Cavalry:

COLONEL: General Smith directs that you immediately dispose your force in such a manner as to cover and guard all approaches to these crossings at King's and Baker's Mills. The infantry of this command will not be able to cross the river before midnight. Colonel Ashby's command has been ordered to halt 2 miles or so from this point, on the main road to Harrodsburg, where the Danville road comes into it, and where there is water. Colonel Wharton has been directed to cover the train which goes by Nicholasville.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Acting Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Bryantsville, Ky., October 12, 1862.

Major D. S. PRINTUP,

Commanding at Richmond, Ky.:

SIR: Major General E. Kirby Smith directs me to say to you that you will hold yourself with your command in readiness to move whenever you receive orders. He further directs that you will collect as many wagons as possible and load them with breadstuffs and send them in the direction of London by Big Hill. You will also have all the cattle driven in ahead of the train, collecting all that may be found in the possession of the commissaries and in that vicinity. He further directs that a sufficient guard be sent with the train, and that it be halted at Rockcastle River until you receive orders from him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNumbers PEGRAM,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Near Bryantsville, Ky., October 12, 1862.

Colonel JOHN H. MORGAN,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that the instructions given you last evening in respect to Lancaster and vicinity are revoked. Instead of operating there you will move with your command on the road from this point to Harrodsburg, approaching as near the latter place as possible, feeling the enemy's pickets, and reporting every two hours to these headquarters. These reports are to be sent to the commanding general regularly, even though nothing important should transpire. Should the enemy advance, hold him in check as long as possible, retiring slowly before him.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. BELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.