War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0915 Chapter XXVIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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to cover Cleburne's movements. He is probably now about opposite to you, and would be of service in giving information of the enemy's movements.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNumbers PEGRAM,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Versailles, Ky., October 5, 1862.

Colonel JOHN H. MORGAN,]

Commanding Cavalry:

SIR: The army is now concentrating at Harrodsburg. Before you can reach Lexington it will possibly be in possession of the enemy. In that case it will be better for you to take the Winchester and Nicholasville road of the Winchester and Richmond road in order to reach us at Harrodsburg. You can inform yourself as to this when you reach Winchester. The general wishes you to keep your command well together. The enemy's cavalry are more cautious than ever, so that you would not have much trouble in disposing of them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNumbers PEGRAM,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Versailles, Ky., October 5, 1862.

General BRAGG,

Commanding Department No. 2, Harrodsburg, Ky.:

GENERAL: Captain Jessee, whom I sent out to get information of the enemy's movements, left Shelbyville at 8 p.m. yesterday, the 4th. General Sill, commanding a division, was there with eighteen regiments of infantry. It was reported by our friends at Shelbyville that General Rousseau was at Taylorsville and General McCook at some point between Taylorsville and Shelbyville. Colonel Scott was at Frankfort this morning at sunrise, a part of his force on the west side of the river. The divisions of Generals Heth and Churchill will encamp to-night on the east side of the Kentucky River, at McCown's Ferry. General Stevenson will remain to-night at Versailles. When he leaves this point his wagons will move by the Lexington and Harrodsburg pike. Colonel Scott has not reported an advance of the enemy upon Frankfort from Hardinsville. I should like to have orders from you that my movements may be in accordance with the plan of operations you may adopt. The position of my command from Covington to this point demand that I should be acquainted with the plans adopted as soon as possible. If a move is to be made to cover Lexington my position is good. The moment I cross the river Lexington, with all its supplies, together with our sick, will be lost, and Colonel Duke's cavalry force, in front of Covington, will be endangered. Unless the blue-grass region is to be abandoned I wish to keep Colonel Duke in front of Covington to watch the force there. I have not yet given him orders to move.

I am, general, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Major-General, Commanding.