War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0906 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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HDQRS. LEFT WING, ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Glenville, Ky., October 4, 1862-10 p.m.

Colonel JOSEPH WHEELER,

Commanding Cavalry:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that this command will move on the Springfield pike and thence via Perryville to Harrodsburg. He wishes you to move your command to Harrodsburg on the route originally selected for this command, viz, via Willisburg and Mackville. There are cavalry pickets at Chaplin and on the Glenville and Bloomfield road, all of which will be withdrawn by you at the proper time. Colonel Pell's detachment will accompany this command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. B. ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.-The general wishes you to send Brown's company cavalry and a squad of Texas Rangers now on the Bloomfield road to him.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., October 4, 1862.

General HUMPHREY MARSHALL,

Commanding, &c., Mount Sterling, Ky.:

GENERAL: I am instructed by the major-general commanding to direct you with your whole command to move by forced marches to this place. Report your arrival at these headquarters.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES BENAGH,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

LEXINGTON, KY., October 4, 1862.

Major General E. KIRBY SMITH,

Frankfort, Ky.:

Mr. McMurty report a large Federal force at or about Crittenden, Ky.; reported 15,000, plundering the country and stealing negroes. Destination, Lexington. He also reports Joe De Witt, with cavalry company, claiming to be Southerners, as ravaging the country, stealing horses, &c.,; also 200 Federal cavalry at Esquire Lucas', 3 miles south of Williamstown. Colonel Gracie indorses McMurty.

JAMES BENAGH,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS. HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT No. 2,

No. 133. Frankfort, Ky., October 4, 1862.

The practice of encamping troops in and near towns and cities is highly injurious to discipline and efficiency and the general advises commanders to avoid it as far as possible. When it becomes necessary a force sufficient for guards, &c., of the best disciplined and commanded troops, should be assigned as a garrison. All other officers and men should be excluded, unless with the written permission of authority as high as a brigade commander. In the face of a powerful and watchful enemy