War of the Rebellion: Serial 023 Page 0892 KY., M. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXVIII.

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The country and the people grow better as we get into the one and arouse the other.

Supplies are not as abundant as I had hoped, so we must draw all we can from the front.

Breckinridge has failed, but General Preston joined me last night. He has great influence here and will forward our recruiting.

Yours, truly,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Bardstown, Ky., September 30, 1862-8 a. m.

General BRAGG:

GENERAL: I send you the inclosed extract of a dispatch received this morning from Colonel Wharton. Major Bankhead, of my staff, whom I had sent to Colonel Wharton to aid in posting his pickets and who was in possession of the details accompanying the information from Louisville, is disposed to give it credence, from the fact that all accounts agree in the great demoralization of Buell's army, arising from Lincoln's proclamation, and that putting it in motion is a measure of safety to him. This does not look very promising for their cause. The information is furnished you for what it is worth. You will be advised of any developments. I wrote you yesterday, saying we were in need of cavalry and informing you of the capture of the greater part of Crawford's regiment. I find Wharton's and Wheeler's available force inadequate for the service required of them. I shall direct all the wagons not required for the supply of subsistence and forage to proceed to Lexington via Harrodsburg forte purpose of transporting supplies to our depot at Bryantsville.

I remain, general, respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. POLK,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., September 30, 1862.

Major General JOHN P. McCOWN,

Commanding Department of East Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: The commanding general directs me to say that he desires you to have a large depot of supplies established at Cumberland Gap with the greatest possible expedition. At least ten day's rations for 20,000 men should be accumulated there in case we should fall back. The mills at Manchester should be kept in that section.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. CUNNINGHAM,

Lieutenant and Acting Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., September 30, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER CUMBERLAND GAP:

SIR: The major-general commanding directs that you send a regiment of cavalry to London, Ky., for the purpose of collecting all the wheat